Sunday, November 6, 2011

SEW DIABETIC BAG FROM SCRAPS-TUTORIAL



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Last year I had a day to play with some left over scraps.




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This was my older bag that I was using. I did pull the zipper off and save it for a further project.




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The bag holds all my supplies that I need to take with me.  The supplies need to not be exposed to moisture as this can give you false readings.  Plastic zip lock bags are sandwiched between the outside fabric and the inside lining.
TUTORIAL BELOW




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SUPPLIES
1.  2 pieces of fabric of your choice.  Measurements for the fabric will depend on you meter and supplies.  Some meters are much smaller.
2.  My pieces of fabric measured 12 1/2" X 7 1/2"
3.  A zipper of matching color or color of your choice
4. quart zip-lock bag.
5. a piece of bias tape of your choice. See making your own bias tape BIAS TAPE INSTRUCTION
6.  Thread to match
INSTRUCTION




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1. After cutting your fabric to its desired length, take the zip lock bag and cut down the sides till you have a rectangle.  Place it on the quilted fabric and attach the plastic bag to the edges with a zig-zag stitch. Then sew an + down the middle as you see in the photo.




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2.  Lay the fabric as you see in the photo above.




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3. Trim the edges until they are even with the fabric on top.




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4. Pin the long edges.  At this point you could zig zag the layers together if you prefer.




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5. Fold the material in half.




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6. Place a pin at the bottom in the middle like in the photo above.  This will mark your spot.  Since my material was plaid I could follow the stripe.  You may need to place a pin on each side. Then draw a line with a sewing chalk pencil from pin to pin to mark where you will start sewing.




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7.  Sew down the middle.




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8. From the middle stitch, measure out (I measured an inch) and mark where you want your other stitching to go to quilt the layers of fabric and plastic together. Continue doing this to the edge. See picture above.




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9.  Turn your fabric and repeat steps 7 through 8 till you have quilted squares.  This could be quilted in any fashion that you prefer




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10.  Pin zipper and sew it as shown in photos above.




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11.  Make sure that you secure the zipper on the end without the zipper tab as shown in photo.




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12.  Attatch your bias tape tab as show in photo above.




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13.  Fold in half inside out and sew up the sides over the zipper.  Zig Zag the edges to prevent raveling.




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Turn right side out, and you are finished.






Friday, February 11, 2011

REFURBISHED POT HOLDERS-TUTORIAL

My pot holders were getting a little ratty as I call it. I needed to make some new ones. The problem was I only had a little lining left to make them with. The nearest fabric shop is 3 hours away and Wal-Mart is 30 minutes away.
So an idea was taking shape.  Why not use the old pot holder as lining.  No trips to town and recycling materials to boot. Here is a tutorial on how my pot holders were refurbished.  There are a lot of pictures in this tutorial.  I hope this will be helpful to new sewers.
1. Start by removing the old binding. It would be too bulky to sew with it on.
2.  Square up your old pot holder.
3.  Measure you old pot holder and add 1/2 inch all the way around for seams. Trace these measurements into a pattern.  I JUST LOVE WAX PAPER.  The reason for the pattern is explained in steps 4 & 5.
4.  One of the reasons I make a pattern is that I usually have pieces of fabric and it makes it easy to cut out on those left over pieces.  I also have a pattern I can store for further brand new pot holders.


5.  The other reason was that I needed to cut out 2 more pieces of lining for the two pot holders that were being refurbished.  The old pot holders were pretty worn down and this would give them a little more padding.
6.  Cut out 4 new fabric pieces from your pattern to make 2 pot holders.  I went into my extra scrap HOMEMADE BIAS TAPE and picked one that would match my pot holders.  Make sure you have enough bias tape to do the number of pot holders you are doing.
 7.  Zig Zag or straight stitch around the edge so it does not ravel and come undone.  I do this as an extra precaution.
8.  Zig Zag around the holes or torn spots so they do not unravel inside your new pot holder.
9. Sew 1/8 inch on the edge of both sides of your bias tape.  Then cut a section the length you will want your tabs plus a seam allowance.
10.  I placed my tab in the middle instead of on one of the edges.  To do this just measure and place your tab as show above in the middle.
11. Take your 2nd piece of new fabric and place over the tab right sides together.
12.  Now place the old pot holder in the middle of your 2 new pot holder pieces, as show above.
13. Place one lining piece in the middle on the opposite side of the placement of the old pot holder. You will have 2 new pot holder pieces right side together with tab in the middle .  Then the old pot holder in the middle on one side; the lining in the middle on the other side. 
14.  Sew 5/8 inch around your pot holder catching the old pot holder and lining. Do not worry if all the lining and old pot holder is not completely caught in the sewing.  It will be secured later.  Leave an opening in the bottom (SEE PICTURE BELOW). Make sure to use a heavy needle to sew through all thicknesses.
15.  Now turn your pot holder right side out through the opening.
16.  Once turned right side out, press your pot holder.  Make sure to evenly turn under the section that was left open in step 15 picture.  
17.  Sew 3/8 inch seam all the way around the new pot holder.
18.  Sew around again 1/8 inch seam.  This will secure the turned under edge.
19.  Starting in one corner sew to the other corner as show in photo.  If you need to with a ruler mark a line from end to end with a tailors chalk pencil.
20.  Fold pot holder in half from corner to corner.  Place a pin in the middle of your last stitching, where you see the arrow.

21.  With a disappearing marking pin place a dot where the pin comes through in the middle on the other side.  If you do not have a marking pin, just place your sewing machine needle as close to the middle as you can.
22.  Place your sewing machine needle on this dot (step 21) and sew to corner.  Then repeat process to the other corner.  Starting in the middle and going to the corner,keeps the fabric from bunching up.  I have learned to do this in a lot of sewing projects.  Every sewing machine feed dogs will stretch the fabric a little when sewing. This has eliminated some of that bunching when you have to sew a long seem or over another line of stitching. 
I now have 2 new pot holders to use and I did not have to leave home to buy lining.
Enjoy-If you have any questions, just leave a question in the comment section and I will reply.


Thursday, January 27, 2011

DIY GLASSES CASE

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HOMEMADE EYE GLASS CASES
I cannot read a thing without my glasses.  I must take them everywhere I go.  My old purchased cases were falling apart so I looked on line and found many nice looking cases I could sew.  The problem was that the glasses could easily fall out of these cases. Therefore the cases were put on the back burner so to speak for the time being.
When I had to make a trip to California I prayed about it and said I need a design for Eye Glass cases.
While warming up my rolls in my MICROWAVE BAGS the Lord brought to my mind that I could make them like these bags only much smaller.


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The next day I headed off to my smaller pieces of fabric stash.  My mother had given me this already quilted fabric.  It was perfect for making my glass cases.
I used the same principles as in my MICROWAVE BAGS to sew up these bags. Just click on MICROWAVE BAGS and learn how to sew these little eye cases.
The  difference was to measure my glasses by length and width and add about 1 1/2 inches to width and 2" to the length.  This allows for a 1/2 inch seam allowance.
Also I did not have to add the linings in this case because this was already quilted fabric.


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Now on this case you can see at the bottom that it is different.  I needed to accommodated for the thickness of my sun glasses.


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To solve the problem above I used the procedure that I did to this old bag. This bag was made several years ago from a sewing book of Nancy's Sewing.
As you can see the bag is inside out.  At the bottom side you can see how I gave this bag width inside.


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This is how you sew either side corner.  When I do this now I trim this to about a 5/8 inch width seam and zig zag the edge. Of course on the glass cases it is much smaller but the technique is the same.
I took these eye cases with me on vacation and never lost my glasses or had them fall out of the cases.
Thats all there is to it.

Friday, January 7, 2011

50's COCA COLA RED WORK TOWEL-TUTORIAL

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THERE IS A CLOSE UP PICTURE AT THE BOTTOM OF TUTORIAL
I came up with this design for my daughter at Christmas Time.  She has a kitchen decorated in 50's restaurant style.
I could not find anything on the internet with coca cola patterns.  I did have a cup with a older coke emblem on it.
That gave me the idea of doing it myself.  As my mom said "when there is a will there is a way."
You should be able to take the instructions given below to copy most any design to embroider.
I did the embroider in what they called Red Embroidery.  For more information on this click here RED WORK EMBROIDERY
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SUPPLIES
1.  Any design that you want to embroider on a t-towel.
2.  Tracing Paper
3.  scissors
4.  ruler
5. Pen for tracing
6. Heat Transfer Pencil  (click)
7. Flour sack type towels
8. Iron
9. Restickable Glue Stick (click)
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I used this (click here) Hamburger Pattern to create my hamburger.


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1.  Take your design (my cup in supply picture) and using a copy machine or home printer to copy the design.
2.  Then taking that picture enlarge the picture until you get it the size you want for your kitchen towel.
3.  Using your pen or pencil trace out the cola bottle on your tracing paper. I then took the traced small bottle and kept enlarging it to get it the right size for my towel.
4.  Do the same with the hamburger.  I eliminated the face on the hamburger for my design.
5.  I traced the coca-cola name and enlarged it also to the size I wanted.
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6.  Using another piece of tracing paper take a (click here) Restickable Glue Stick and glue your traced items onto the paper in just a couple places on each item. This will be your pattern, so place it the way you want it positioned on your towel.
Note: it was a good thing I used Restickable Glue Stick because I had the coke bottle going the wrong direction in the picture.
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7.  Flip the tracing paper with the pattern underneath.
8.  At this point you may want to draw a line to place the name in the center of your design.
9.  Using your pencil or pen trace the designs onto the tracing paper.
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This is what it should look like.  In this picture the coca-cola  paper is still attached to the back.  I wanted to make sure that I had it where I wanted it.
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10.  Now with your pattern flipped over, trace all of your design with your Heat Transfer Pencil.
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11. Take your flour sack towel and fold in half and press with your iron.
12.  On this fold ironed line cut your flour sack down the middle.
13.  Cut the hems off.
14.  At this point using my cutting board and rotary cutter I evened out the towel by trimming off the uneven edges.
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15. Pen your homemade transfer pattern onto the middle of your towel.  Leave enough room if you are going to sew trim on the bottom edge of your towel.
16.  Use your heated up iron and sit your iron on one section.  Lift and do another section.  DO NOT MOVE THE IRON AROUND OR IT WILL SMEAR.  When you think you have ironed over the entire pattern do it again.  Then check the design by undoing a bottom pen and carefully lift to see if the design is on your towel.
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This is what it will look like when transfered to your towel.
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You are now ready to embroider your design.
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Here is a close up of my finished towels.
I did not take pictures of the decorated borders for a tutorial.  Here is a (click here) TUTORIAL on how to add borders to the bottom of your towels.
Hope you enjoyed my towels-I really enjoyed creating the patterns.
Feel free to copy anything here and use as you wish.